Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow and the Early Writers

Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow and the Early Writers

This paper is ENG 201 American Literature to 1865 Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow and the Early Writers The works of Whitman, Dickinson and Longfellow bear many similarities as well as differences in terms of tone and language with that of the early writers. Whitman employs a hopeful tone in most of his writings. His main objective is to give hope to people that they can still receive salvation. For instance in the poem “A Noiseless Patient Spider”, Whitman writes: “And you, O my soul, where you stand, surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space, ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheres to connect them…” (Kummings, 2005). p. 327). Early writers such as Jonathan Edwards chose a menacing tone in most of his summons. He threatens followers with damnation using metaphors as in: “The God that holds you over the spit of hell, much as one holds a spider …. Over the fire; His wrath towards you burns like fire …” (Edwards and Frankena, 1960,...
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Nature in Early and Latter American Literature

Nature in Early and Latter American Literature

Nature in Early and Latter American Literature Both the earliest writings of Iroquois League and Jonathan Edwards and the latter works of Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman contain rich expressions on nature. However, it is the different ways in which nature is presented during the puritan period (16th to 17th) century and during the latter period that sets the works apart. The purists viewed nature as a physical manifestation of God. To them, nature provided the lens through which man could see or sense and understand God. The sheer beauty of nature is in their views illustrative of a Divine Being. Man was part of nature and thus could not have dominion over it. On the other hand, the transcendentalists (Emerson, Thoreau & Whitman) held the premise that man must understand nature in order to increase his aesthetic, moral and intellectual knowledge. Additionally, a return to nature was the only sure way for man to invigorate his spirit and to rejuvenate his...
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Psychological Critical Approach Analyzing change in Hawthorne’s

Psychological Critical Approach Analyzing change in Hawthorne’s

Psychological Critical Approach Analyzing change in Hawthorne’s The psychological critical approach is a revolutionary way of providing literal criticism. It combines the aspects of modern psychology and literal criticism. In particular, Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalytic theory mainly forms the basis of literal criticism. This theory contends that the human mind is made up of the conscious and the unconscious components. This paper will apply the psychological critical approach to analyze change in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”. Goodman Brown goes through change when he leaves Salem Village for the gathering deep into the forest. From a psychoanalytic approach, Brown moves from the conscious realm (Salem village) into an unconscious realm (the forest). While Brown had a good understanding of the village, the forest was a mysterious place for him that evoked fear. As he enters the forest, conscious thoughts about Faith and the gathering he is to attend fill his mind. For instance, he says, “What a wretch am I, to leave her on...
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