American Military History

Effectiveness of the Confederate blockade-runners and why they were able to sustain the Confederacy until late in the civil war The American civil war began in 1861 to 1865 and created problems for Anglo-American relations due to Confederate interests to build commercial Raiders in British shipyards and to provide the blockade-runners to service the Southern economy. During 1862 the armed commerce raiders CSS Florida and CSS Alabama have been constructed in Liverpool shipyards, put to sea, armed with British guns and mostly manned by sailors who were British. Liverpool was a center of pro-confederate sentiment, the major British port city for the import of Southern cotton, the distribution point to the textile factories in the Midlands, and the major shipyards for the construction of both British blockade-runners and Confederate commerce raiders. The British colony of Bermuda became a leading mid-Atlantic port for the reshipment of goods intended for blockade-runners attempting to bring supplies through the Union naval blockade into the Confederacy (Long, 2013)....
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American Revolution

American Revolution Explain how logistical issues that the British military encountered in the Revolutionary War contributed to the American victory The Revolutionary War pitted the Great Britain against 13 North American colonies. During the war, the British faced a number of logistical challenges that significantly contributed to their defeat. The first issue involves an ineffective supply chain operation by the British army (McCoy, n.d). Supply chain operations generally involve the mechanisms for moving a product or service from one point to another where they are required. The British army was unable to sufficiently provide critical requirements to soldiers due to the long distances involved. Consequently, the army suffered from lack of basic amenities such as food and munition. Ireland provided much of the food supplies to the British army. Shipment occurred through a port known as (Cork McCoy, n.d). However, a combination of factors such as poor packaging, corruption, and poor quality control limited the amount of supplies arriving from the ships...
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Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South

Question BOOK: Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South,  by Paul Finkelmen After you summarize the book, in one paragraph you must identify at least two themes/points made by the author which you plan to discuss/analyze. Again, after you summarize the book, in one single paragraph you must specifically identify your two points for analysis. Thank you! Answer Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South The book defending slavery: proslavery thought in the old South written by Paul Finkelman is one of the many historical books written with a basic aim of showing how the southerners who are known for their strong stand in support of slavery in the 19th century. The author of the book tries to show his readers how the southerners feel and think about slavery. The book begins with quotes from Thomas Jefferson notes on the state of Virginia and ends with Josiah Nott’s instinct of races. It is worth noting that the author tries to question the legitimacy...
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History of America between 1800 and 1860

History of America between 1800 and 1860

Question How did plantation crops and the slavery system change between 1800 and 1860? Why did these changes occur? History of America between 1800 and 1860 The plantation crops and the slavery system underwent remarkable changes between 1800 and 1860. In the early 1800, the cotton industry experienced rapid expansion in the South. This was mainly driven by the invention of cotton gin, a machine that could easily process fine fibers from cotton seeds (Henretta and Brody, 2010). With the invention of the machine, the area under cotton cultivation increased drastically. This resulted to the ripple effect of increased demand for labor, which was dependent on slaves. It is worth noting that the development of the Southern states’ economies was hinged on cotton production and exportation (Henretta and Brody, 2010). With the high demand for slavery, the southern states were overzealous to acquire more slaves from the neighboring states such as the western territories, with the hope that the trade would not die. In...
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Who was to blame for Britain’s failure to win a quick victory over the American rebels?

Who was to blame for Britain’s failure to win a quick victory over the American rebels?

Question Who was to blame for Britain's failure to win a quick victory over the American rebels: General Howe, General Burgoyne, or the ministers in London? Explain your answer. American History General Howe held the greatest responsibility for Britain’s failure to win a quick victory over the American rebels. During the Battle of Bunker Hill (1776), Howe’s army sustained a great number of casualties leading to a change of tactics in the forthcoming wars (Schecter, 2002). Howe had greatly underestimated the rebellion, which resulted to a great loss with over 1000 of his soldiers dead. Following the loss, Howe took a more conservative approach in the remaining battles, often opting out of strong enemy lines. This significantly hindered his ability to eliminate the rebels who had ample time to plan and orchestrate attacks (Schecter, 2002). In 1776, Howe made great success in advancing his aims of taking New York when he emerged the winner at the Battle of Long Island. This pushed the American...
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